Patience Increases Enterprise Fraud Risks in Asia

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The Asian culture of patience may inevitably put enterprises at risk of enterprise fraud, warned anti-fraud consultancy UKFraud Managing Director Bill Trueman.

“In terms of fraud, this means that fraudsters will also be less impatient, and feel happy to ‘take their time’ with the fraud to make sure that it is right and for the biggest sum,” he said

One way to mitigate this is for Asian enterprises to support or drive the business into making sure that IT supports the relevant processes.

“Every new product or programme change should have ‘fraud thinking’ in it as the fraud losses will be high if the deterrents, protections and processes are not planned for up front.”

He stressed that Asian businesses need to be more aware and pre-emptive, and have a longer time-span in its thinking about fraud and fraudsters.

“Asian business will need to take the same precautions as any other business around the world – not least as they will have the similar issues of technology, systems, processes and of course, people too.”

Other tips he offered for strengthening enterprise IT infrastructures are:

  • Focus attention and efforts on the payments and money transmission areas of the business, and in particular the authorisation of payments, and the tendering for business and projects.

“Make sure that all such transactions are dual-controlled. At least two people need to be involved in payments and these people need to be within a hierarchy and graded by the payment sizes.”

  • Use business technology solutions along with strong operational processes and procedures to monitor what the team is doing. Review the monitoring and exceptions 100% of the time and ensure that there is a system and process for dealing with the problems that occur. And lastly as a deterrent, communicate to the team that the monitoring is happening.
  • Retain, keep, store and back-up data and transactions.

“Nothing should be deletable and people should see and know that this is the case – again as a deterrent.”

Bill Trueman (an independent fraud and risk specialist) is director of RiskSkill and UKFraud.

This article originally published here.

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Judges Pave Way for Banks in US to Sue Target over 2013 Data Breach

I read with interest that news in Finextra and elsewhere that the banks have been given the go-ahead to sue Target for $30m for the reissue costs associated with the data compromise in 2013. This puzzles me, as I then want to know how the figure of $1200 per card is calculated.

The cost of re-issue will be less than a tenth of that per card. How they can justify that size of loss based upon a reissue alone is not conceivable.

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AIRFA – “Association of Independent Risk & Fraud Advisors” Formed

Much awaited and anticipated independent organization named AIRFA i.e “Association of Independent Risk & Fraud Advisors” formed and formally launched recently. This is an UK based independent and global member organization which provides free membership for every fraud prevention specialist, risk review specialists from worldwide. Any fraud prevention and risk review expert can join this organization.

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The ultimate motto behind this organization is to provide useful & legal advice on risk review and fraud prevention issues to corporates, companies, businesses, enterprises, insurance companies, banks, government organization, media corporations, journalists, and even common people.

The independent members of AIRFA can help enterprises tools & strategies in preventing fraud and total risk review assessment. Be it corporate fraud, bank fraud, credit card fraud, debit card fraud, enterprise fraud, government organization fraud or any commercial scam, AIRFA can provide an effective solution.

You can visit website of  AIRFA at http://www.airfa.net/

You can also connect with AIRFA at following:

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Current Fraud Trends in 2013 & Upcoming Years

We know that when technology in the world changes so the techniques used by the Fraudsters to commit frauds in the organizations, ans such fraud techniques and fraud trends keeps on changing year on year basis. Similarly UK Fraud the leading Corporate Fraud Prevention organization of the Europe has identified the leading 10 Fraud Trends in the coming years.

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A fraud consultancy UKFraud has identified 10 key trends that it suggests will characterise the domestic fraud prevention market. The ten are:

1. With more high quality data becoming available to fraudsters than ever, an economy forecast to contract and the UK’s benefits spend reducing, overall fraud levels will continue to increase dramatically across the UK and the rest of Europe. Fraud hotspots most likely to be affected in 2013 include: banks and card companies, insurers, online merchants, retailers and government be it HMRC, the universal credit scheme or local authorities.

2. The types of fraud likely to see the biggest growth will be CNP (Card Not Present) card fraud, other forms of cybercrime, internal fraud, and supply chain fraud. Procurement fraud is also set to rise significantly. In contracting economies, evidence suggests that people inside this function can be put under pressure to defraud.

3. Mortgage fraud is also set to surge in 2013, with credit rating experts pointing the finger at further rises in first-party fraud – ie where people misrepresent their finances whilst applying for mortgages. Once again the economic climate is a significant contributor in this.

4. Recent spectacular mass data breaches and suspicion of cloud security in some areas will continue. An increasingly greater emphasis will be placed upon PCI DSS and other data security and integrity issues. Already, the daily number of automated attacks on bank and retailer systems runs into the millions, which means that we will continue to see major high-profile data breaches both reported and otherwise.

5. Solutions will be based around systems for acquirers, online merchants and PSPs, who are regularly the victims of CNP fraud – where fraud is growing fast in line with the growth in internet based payments. Increasingly, solutions will move to better and newer generations of screening, scoring and risk based monitoring, such as those based upon Bayesian based fraud detection systems. These will start to pose a real challenge to older systems based on ‘so called’ Neural Networks.

6. Most people feel that there could be a lack of unified central direction and strategy from government. The lack of a pan-European strategy will also prevail. The UK government’s response is divided between the NFA, the Cyber Crimes unit and the Cabinet Office’s FED (Fraud Error and Debt Initiative). Some believe passionately that the lack of a unified central government strategy will drive up fraud significantly in 2013. On the positive side, at least some of the civil servants who have been involved in the NFA since the beginning are starting to gain real experience of the sector and an appreciation of the enormous challenges they face. The DWP is also tendering to get some real-world fraud strategy skills into their midst too, which should prove invaluable given the changes due with the Universal Credit.

7. The USA is increasingly ready for a policy U-turn on the adoption of signature as the CVM of choice. The US market will find it increasingly difficult to evolve in a global payment systems world without the protections offered either by PINs – or a ‘next generation’ solution. As the rest of the world is moving (or largely has moved) in this direction already, 2013 could see this U-turn as fraud increasingly migrates to the US.

8. Major insurers will continue to develop a strong and very credible fraud prevention solution based around the ‘front end’ (underwriting stage of business) The emphasis on delivering a strong industry wide data-sharing drive will also continue to increase; although a whole re-think of the industry fraud register will be needed to address Data Protection Act requirements.

9. There will be a major shift in the presence, position and fraud service offerings of one or more of the major data-bureaux (such as credit reference agencies), as more solutions either move ‘in-house’ or move to systems developed by a host of new players in various fraud sectors.

10. And there will be some surprises as there always are – whether they are policemen ‘on-the-take’, another raft of politicians fiddling their expenses, or further high profile banks brought to their knees by (usually) rogue traders.

“The current economic climate is driving change and there is an evolution in the world of fraud prevention that we have not seen before,” says Bill Trueman, founder and CEO of UKFraud and RiskSkill. “However, if we are to stay ahead of the fraudster, we have to be able to read these trends and manage both our strategy and the risks accordingly. In highlighting what we see as the trends, we aim to contribute to the debate and raise awareness of the risks. By keeping this debate alive we hope that fraud prevention will shortly gain an even greater emphasis in key seats of power – be that in the boardroom or within key government departments.”

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